US HOME WORK FORCE “Work from home” – TRUE REVIEW

US HOME WORK FORCE “Work from home” REVIEW

 

US HOME WORK FORCE REVIEW

* Clicking on the image above will take you to US HOME WORK FORCE. We do NOT get any benefit for your click thru. We are NOT an affiliate. We include this link ONLY so you can see what we are describing for yourself if you wish. Inclusion of this link is NOT an endorsement! See below for full review.

I have not done it, but I do know exactly how it works. It’s risky and not really what they claim it is. Here are the details:

You post classified ads (ads already created for you) on websites like facebook and craigslist. They are about 15 other different websites. The ad you post invites people to join “US HOME WORK FORCE”. You are recruiting people to do the same thing that you are doing.

The “catch” is, you will not be “hired” to do this, they will not hire you, they will not allow you to participate unless you first give them your name, email address, and phone number and second, you must accept what they call a “free offer” (a free offer is when you take a free trial for a product or service, like using Netflix or FreeCreditScore.com, or trying a product like Magicjack for a month). They say “all workers must complete one free offer”. Which free offer you choose does not matter, it’s up to you. There are about 50 to choose from, all are fairly well known companies, including those mentioned above as well as Discover, DirectTV, and Blockbuster just to name a few. Oh, and you’ll need a PayPal account. More about that in a moment.

US HOME WORK FORCE - Free Trial Offer Examples

Now, here’s another “catch”. A “free offer” is not really always free. What they mean by a “free offer” is really a TRIAL OFFER. A trial offer usually means you get to use a service of product for one full month and if you’re not happy with that service or product after 30 days you don’t pay for the 30 days of use or you pay for it and then get a refund (less any shipping and handling that may have been charged). You don’t have to pay for the item or service as long as  you return the item or cancel the service. But to do this you must contact them and follow the company’s instructions on how to cancel the trial offer to the letter!

For example, a “free offer” for Netflix may be getting one month of Netflix for free, a trial offer, and if you don’t like it you don’t have to pay for that first month or subsequent months. What they’re counting on is one of two things will happen. They’re hoping you’ll like Netflix and continue using their service, paying for it every month. Or, they’re hoping you’ll forget to ask to close the account and they charge your credit card for subsequent months because you forgot to stop the offer.

Yes, that’s right, you can NOT complete any “free” trial offer unless you give that company your credit card information and give them permission to charge your credit card should you fail to stop the service after the free trial period. This is legit, but they are hoping you’ll either forget to cancel, not follow the cancelation process properly, or decide to continue using their service or product and pay each month after that.

Another example of a so-called “free” trial offer is buying a Magicjack, using it for 30 days, and if you don’t like it you can send it back and your credit card will not be charged (or it will be charged and then you have to ask them to refund your card). BUT if you fail to send it back in time or if it is damaged in the mail or lost in the mail, or arrives back to them late, you will be charged for the Magicjack and there is no way to get a refund. AND, you have to pay for shipping the item back.

So you see, some (many) of these so-called “free” trial offers can actually cost you money if  you’re not careful. And, if you don’t follow the return or stop-offer or end-service rules exactly you will be charged in full for the item or service you were using in a “free” trial.

The work from home opportunity you’re being given is recruiting others to join US HOME WORK FORCE to do the same thing. You are recruiting people who will recruit people, and everyone who is recruited has to accept one “free” trial offer.

How do you get paid? The ads you post have a special link in them that tracks your click thrus (your name will show in the URL). For example if your name is John Smith the link people click on will bring them to a website (provided for you) with your name like http://ushomeworkforce.net/johnsmith. The website they are sent to (your website) will look exactly like the one you went to when you were recruited by US HOME WORK FORCE. To see what this website looks like you can visit US HOME WORK FORCE by clicking on the US HOME WORK FORCE IMAGE at the top of this page. Clicking on the image above will take you to the US HOME WORK FORCE website (a new browser window will open so you are not directed away from this article). We do NOT get any benefit for your click thru. We are NOT an affiliate. We include the link ONLY so you can see what we are describing, for yourself, if you wish. Inclusion of this link is NOT an endorsement!

Supposedly you get paid $20 for each person you recruit to do the same thing you did (complete a “free” trial offer) if they click thru your link and website. All they have to do is complete a trial offer. You do not have to pay to have the website.

US HOME WORK FORCE says they pay you daily to your PayPal account. Daily means only on the days you actually recruit someone. That may mean every day or it may mean once a month, depending on how many people you recruit each day (none or ten or more).

This is not a true scam, but it is shady in that they make it sound like something it is not and if you’re not careful it can cost you money. And if you’re not successful, it can all be for nothing. Since I have not done it I cannot tell you if US HOME WORK FORCE actually pays you or not and I cannot tell you if US HOME WORK FORCE sells your name and email address, or if they respect your privacy.

There is one more HUGE issue you need to take into consideration with this work from home offer….

Let’s assume it all works out fine; the free trial offer process goes well, you don’t get ripped off, you recruit others to do the same thing, your privacy is not invaded (no spam, no selling of your email address), and you actually get paid for each person you recruit. Heck, you may even end up recruiting 20 people a day!! This is highly doubtful, but possible. Well, that means for each day that goes by that you recruit at least one person a payment will be made to your PayPal account. It might be $60 on Monday, $20 on Tuesday, $100 on Wednesday, etc. But after 200 of these payments (which can total as little as $4,000 if you only recruit one person per day) PayPal is required by law to report the payments you received from US HOME WORK FORCE to the IRS. “So what?” you ask. You’re willing to pay income tax as long as you make more money so you don’t care? Not so fast. Wait, there’s more….

IRS AuditSo, if you want to do this you MUST be prepared to have ALL of your income from PayPal reported to the IRS and that opens up a hole other can of worms. It means you will need to pay the IRS income tax on ALL of the money that came into your PayPal account (even if some of the money in your PayPal account came from someplace else, like ebay sales). That means the IRS will now be paying very close attention to every transaction in your PayPal account, and quite possibly this may trigger an audit from time to time (if they don’t like the amount of money you claim) and they will do this from now until the day you die.

Tax Audit SignAnd don’t think you can escape this IRS scrutiny by closing your PayPal account. Doesn’t matter, once you’re in the cross hairs of the IRS you will always be there. And it doesn’t matter if you close your PayPal account and open another because PayPal tracks you and knows the accounts are all for the same person. You can’t even use a fake name and address (and we are not suggesting you do) because PayPal only allows you to take your money out if you have a real bank account to transfer it to, and that bank account has to match the name and address you gave PayPal when you opened the PayPal account.

There’s more. The fact that PayPal must report what you’ve been paid to the IRS (and also state tax officials) and the fact that you are not paying income tax ahead of time, means not only that you will surely OWE the IRS taxes on April 15th (and possibly the state taxes, depending on what state you live in), but you may also owe the IRS and state penalties for not paying income tax ahead of time (like you do when an employer takes it out of your paycheck each week). That’s right – the IRS and state tax officials do not like when you owe too much money, even if you pay it. Over the last few years both the IRS and state tax agencies have been imposing penalties and fines if you owe too much in taxes at the end of a year – yes, even if you pay them all your taxes on April 15th the IRS (and state tax agencies) may charge you a fee/fine/penalty for not paying ahead of time (as you earn).

IRS and TAX Frustration & ProblemsTo sum it all up; there is a possibility you can make money, but there is no guarantee that you do, or if you do then how much, and if you do make money it can cause you more problems than you may be willing to deal with because of the way you get paid and the IRS hassles invovled. If they were to pay you by check, and take out income tax (just like an employer) we’d consider recommending this line of “work”, but the whole PayPal payment aspect of it just does not sit well with us at all.

Lastly, I’ve done these types of things before, posting links in hopes people will click on them and you get paid for the click thru, and I have NEVER made a dime. I’m done trying for myself, but I’ll keep looking into them and reporting it to you so you can make your own decisions.

Dan,
Co-founder, www.PracticalWaysToSaveMoney.com

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